Recommend me a decent laptop

Discussion in 'Tech Discussion' started by Ripple, Aug 6, 2018.

  1. Ripple

    Ripple Notice me Daisydacrazy senpa

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    I'll be going to University in a couple months so Can I get some recommendations for a decent not too expensive laptop(below $800 aprox):aww:
    I kinda want to do a bit of gaming but not too intensive. Stuff like Dota2,slay the spire,fallout and such.
     
  2. Inute

    Inute Daydreamer

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  3. Glib

    Glib Well-Known Member

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    lol
     
  4. CyberCypher

    CyberCypher Air Breather

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    cant tell you specifics laptop just the specs for non-intensive games
    you would need ( as a minimum)
    processor speeds = 2.5ghz or higher
    ram= 4gb
    64-bit operating system
    cant tell you about he graphics card but mine is a Nvidia card

    also, fallout 4 is an intensive game basically any openworld rpg or a graphic heavy FPS (looking at you COD) after 2015 would probably need a dedicated gaming laptop
     
  5. Oblivion

    Oblivion Well-Known Member

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    The Acer Nitro 5!! I got it upgraded to $799 but I had 12 GBs of RAM, 256 GB SSD and 1 TB Hard Drive. It also has a Nvidia GTX 1050 TI!!!!So its a little beefy and can run some games on it for only 799!!
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2018
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  6. jinxs2011

    jinxs2011 [Rebel Against Normality][Writer of the Unusual]

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    Nah, mine's not a gaming laptop, probs bought it pre- 2015, and it runs fallout 4 just fine. Not best graphics settings, admittedly, but well enough. Does heat up a bit tho. Dunno bout the others~
     
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  7. kraya

    kraya Well-Known Member

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    Go buy yourself one in the predator series.
     
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  8. bob3002

    bob3002 Well-Known Member

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    If you want the best gaming experience, Something like this MSI would do. Reviews say it has relatively short battery life, which might be a problem for several hours of unplugged use per day. But you likely won't find anything more powerful on the CPU or GPU side for $800 right now.

    Just be aware that gaming laptops are quite bulky because they produce a lot of heat and have to move it outside the system with fans, so buy a big enough backpack if you plan to move it.
     
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  9. Truerror

    Truerror Well-Known Member

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    An Acer Nitro 5. You might even be able to get an 8th gen i5 if you're lucky enough. Probably the best value-for-money laptop out there currently, if you like to game.
     
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  10. WinByDying

    WinByDying I can count to four

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    Using clockspeeds to describe a processor is soooooo 2000. It's more complicated now. Well, it's always been more complicated but today nobody cares as much anymore about clock speeds. The old Pentium days are long gone. Let me go on a bit of a rant about CPU's before getting to the real advice. TL;DR is underlined.

    CPU
    Do you know how processors work? I'll give you a rough explanation. There's instructions from an instruction set (in this case x86-64), clock cycles and clock speed. Each clock cycle handles a limited number of instructions, depending on the CPU design. Then, a limited number of cycles can be handled each second, thus giving, in the end, the processor an instructions/second limit. Clock speed is thus only a part of the equation, and the average instruction per clock (IPC) can vary strongly: different instruction sets, different architectures, different designs and especially when different manufacturers are involved. Those interested might know that this isn't the entire story; features largely depending on the architecture (thus tied to a specific manufacturer) like branch prediction and multithreading.

    Now, on to the next point. Say, we're talking about Intel processors today in a laptop. What's the first feature to stand out, besides clock speed? The number of cores. Although far from all games still don't make good uses of multiple cores, some games do and some even require it. You always want at least two, but four is safer if you would want to play certain games coming out in the near future.

    Clock speed does matter, and actually probably the most in games. Namely, those badly optimized games I was talking about earlier. Intel and AMD both have variable clock rate CPU's these days, through boost clocks. Basically, the manufacturer lets the chip overclock itself if the cooling/temperatures allow for it. The processor of the laptop I'm currently using has a base clock speed of 2.5GHz, and boost clock of 3.5GHz. In practice, the 3.5GHz will only be reached for short loads, not for gaming. Thus, for quad cores, look at base clock speed. Intel does have e.g. U processors with lower base clock speeds and higher boost clocks, e.g. dualcore 2.0/3.1GHz, those will of course run somewhere inbetween. Those CPU's performance is actually pretty OK. Now, literally no decent enough quad core will have low base clock speeds, so you actually don't even have to look at the clock speeds. Just make sure you don't have a power saving model if you want to go the performance route.

    Also, if you go intel go i5 or i7, but remember that only some laptop i5's are quad cores. i7's always are.


    RAM

    These days, go for 8GB at least. For OP's budget, 8GB RAM in laptops is probably the norm. Some heavier games today ask for 8GB. 4GB is like close to the minimum for Windows, and in larger games like Fallout you might hit the limit and get intimately acquainted with the pagefile, something you really want to avoid. This means Windows will compensate for your lack of RAM by storing some on your permanent storage (HDD/SSD) which is a fuckton slower than RAM, resulting in maybe stutter in the game, maybe pop-in of models and textures, high loading times, ...

    OS
    Literally nobody buying new runs 32-bit OS's. Nobody in their right minds runs it, except with older hardware. Or maybe legacy software requirements, but there might be other solutions thereto. Anyway, when buying a laptop today, they're all 64-bit. Or you're living in the middle of Africa.

    Graphics Card
    The graphics card, sometimes called GPU because there's a GPU on the graphics card, is what's important for most 3D games like Fallout. Assuming you don't mean Fallout 1/2. You can find a lot of benchmarks online, especially for a well-known game like e.g. Fallout 4. Just go with the best you can get while still having good other components. Having at least 2GB of VRAM is a plus when playing texture heavy 3D games like Fallout 4. Watch out though; GDDR5 VRAM, not DDR3. DDR3 sucks ass as VRAM.

    Storage
    Try to get an SSD. If you forego the SSD, going for a cheaper HDD instead, avoid 5400RPM HDD's even if they have an SSD cache. With an Optane cache it might be fine, but getting an SSD is the reliable option. This makes a noticeable difference in daily use and games: just in general use (slowdowns due to 100% storage drive use less frequent), when copying files, loading times, ...

    Battery
    You'll have to sacrifice on battery time, probably. Good luck, pray for two hours or a bit more, that's my guess of what you'll end up with if you buy a light gaming laptop. If you want more than that, you'll have to sacrifice the gaming specs to an extent.

    Screen, build quality and other factors
    When buying a gaming laptop, these other factors are often not taken in consideration. Try to get a laptop with a decent screen, avoid TN panels. Check a review for maximum brightness if you want to use it outside often. Good build quality is a plus, e.g. an aluminium frame is often tougher than a plastic one. If you want to know more about the keyboard and the touchpad, you'd probably have to look for a review.

    TL;DR for OP: it's underlined. No specific suggestions, just guidelines. Others in this thread seem to have suggested OK models, like the cheaper Acer Nitro's. MSI is generally a bit pricier, less bang for the buck oriented.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2018
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  11. Rephidim

    Rephidim Well-Known Member

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    go buy the new Dell laptop :)
     
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